Getting Hyped About HyperDocs

Remember webquests? Webquests were big when I started teaching.  Students would work through a self-paced digital assignment, completing ordered tasks linked to websites in the internet. Webquests were designed to learn about a concept or topic. HyperDocs are like webquests on steroids…not necessarily bigger, but so much better!

So, What is a Hyperdoc? 

Lisa Highfill, Kelly Hilton, and Sarah Landis have written The Hyperdoc Handbook: Digital Lesson Design Using Google Apps as a primer for getting started using HyperDocs effectively in your classroom. It is available in both print and digital formats. According to the writers,  “HyperDocs are digital lessons that you give to students for engaging, inquiry-based learning.”

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But Isn’t That Just a Fancy Document with Hyperlinks?

In a word, no. True HyperDocs ask students to dig deeper, master content, and demonstrate a deeper understanding. Hyperdocs also allow teachers to build in supports to aid in understanding of the content. In her blog, Karly Moura explains this well.

The beauty of HyperDocs is that the creation of the doc itself requires the teacher to take into consideration the needs of the students, how they will engage in the content, what ways they can reflect on their own learning, and how they can show what they know. It is also ALL about packaging. HyperDocs LOOK engaging because they are. Kids enjoy doing them and while they are learning, collaborating, creating and reflecting in their doc the teacher is given the gift of time to connect with students and engage in quality conversations with them about their learning.

Ms. Moura also created a wonderful graphic illustrating the differences between a document with hyperlinks and a HyperDoc.




 

 

 

Here is an example of a HyperDoc on Growth Mindset created by Lindsay Reed.

img_0190-1Even though this was Ms. Reed’s first attempt at a HyperDoc for her middle school learners, she does a great job of creating a lesson that is engaging and includes multiple methods of delivering information and demonstrating understanding. It also requires completing tasks and answering in ways that require higher order thinking skills…Hallmarks of a good HyperDoc.

How Do HyperDocs Fit Into the Blended Learning Environment?

As I have stated previously, blended learning is any combination of face-to-face and online learning. HyperDocs allow for students to explore and master content online, at their own pace. They can receive lecture, face-to-face instruction in small groups or one-on-one with an educator and the online component of blended instruction via HyperDocs. This can easily fit in a rotation model, flipped classroom model, etc.

But Wait There’s More! 

For the low, low price of $0 you too can access these resources! The website associated with the book is a buffet of ideas, tips, and tools made by the authors and shared by the the community of educators. The community has embraced the idea of teachers sharing resources for FREE (remember that is my favorite price) and the amount of knowledge and expertise being exchanged is phenomenal! The point is, share what you create, partake of what others share…everyone wins.

  1. Hyperdocs.co website created by Lisa Highfill, Kelly Hilton, and Sarah Landis, writers of The Hyperdoc Handbook: Digital Lesson Design Using Google Apps
  2. Teachersgiveteachers.net an exchange where users can submit their HyperDoc lessons and download lessons created by other educators to use or modify for their classroom needs.
  3. #Ditchbook with #HyperDocs #BetterTogether Sharing Extravaganza! Padlet by Karly Moura where educators have contributed an assortment of HyperDocs.
  4. Hyperdoc Links by Merle Goess is a Padlet that lists a wide range of HyperDoc resources.
  5. HyperDocs Facebook Group is a forum for all things HyperDocs. It is a very welcoming community where teachers share resources and ideas.
  6. How to HyperDoc by Nicole Beardsley is a HyperDoc that is also a model for introducing HyperDocs!


Why Use HyperDocs?

  • Personalized, self paced, and flexible
  •  Room to differentiate with alternate texts for individuals or groups of students, individualized scaffolds like text to speech readers, various ways for students to “show what they know” using multiple learning styles
  • Engaging
  • Use the skills 21st century learners need
  • Less lecture and read and respond lessons of traditional teaching
  • Requires intense interaction with and a deeper understanding of content
  • Excellent tools for blended learning
  • Many lessons already created by peers in the community (educators) that are modifiable for your needs
  • Templates to get you started online

Best of all…you’ll have more time to work with students in small groups and one-on-one while your students are engaged in meaningful instruction! Explore HyperDocs as a means to meet the needs of your learners.

If you are already using HyperDocs, or are exploring their use in your classroom, or you just have questions/comments, please be sure to add your thoughts to the comment section below. Thank you for reading!

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Using Social Media to Demonstrate Reading Comprehension and Content Mastery

If you are an avid user of Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and other social media platforms, there is a good chance your students are either using or aware of them as well. Students are using these tools creatively in my class to show their understanding of a literary text. There are also possibilities to apply these activities in any classroom where explaining thinking is required. In ELA I am able to assess if students understand plot, character motives, relationships, etc. all by reading their “texts.” In social studies, students could have discussions between world leaders and/or historical figures across time. This is especially relevant if those figures lived in different eras. Across content areas, students could create the Facebook pages, text screenshots, Snapchats, etc. for inventors, scientists, historical figures, book characters, mathematicians…regardless of time of barriers like language, lifespan, or location. The possibilities are endless.

Screenshots of text messages between book characters

Cinderella's phone Prince-Hey it's the prince, Cinderella-what's up, Prince-I think I found your shoe, Cinderella-Where, Prince-on the steps outside my house, (image of a glass slipper), Prince-Is this yours?, Cinderella-Yes! I must have dropped it when I ran out! I missed my curfew!
Screenshots of fake text message exchanges between literary characters.

In the article, Creative Lessons with Fake Texts, Tweets, Facebook Pages and More by Nick LaFave, the author discusses several  links to social media simulators that you can use with your students. This is not an exhaustive list of what is available, but offers a great place to start! All sites should be thoroughly explored by an adult first. Have fun creatively using social media in your own classroom, without many of the worries of social media access!

 

 

 

 

 

Exciting Times in EdTech: Blended Learning

Once an Early Adopter, Always an Early Adopter…

I am what you call an “early adopter.” I love trying new technologies in my classroom. I am very happy when I get new tech. No, that is an understatement. The day they hung my interactive whiteboard I cried…real tears. When the technology support person surprised me with a Chromebook cart the day we returned from Spring Break, two years ago, I greeted him with a screeched out, “ARE YOU SERIOUS!!!” The moment is now a blur, but I may have hugged him.

I see the value in giving my students opportunities that technology can provide. Anyone who reads this blog also knows that I LOVE anything that helps me to do my job with efficiency. Make it easier and I am on board! Now that I have made the jump from elementary to secondary education, it is even more evident that technology can help us to engage our learners in exciting ways.

Why Blended Learning? Because Time…

As a middle school language arts teacher, I have a wide range of students with varying levels of ability and drive. I serve a large number of students who receive ELL services, students who receive special education services, students who receive varying levels of reading intervention and students who receive no interventions or services beyond my care. Those are very diverse needs. So how does one even begin to meet the needs of such a range of learners? At first glance (as well as glances 2-22) this seems a very daunting task. The key for me has been to work smarter not harder by implementing technology to the greatest advantage.

I heavily rely on the use of blended learning strategies. According to Catlin Tucker, co-author of Blended Learning in Action: A Practical Guide Toward Sustainable Change, blended learning is any combination of face-to-face and online learning. Keeping that in mind, in my classroom, I use technology as a second (and sometimes third and fourth) teacher in and outside of the classroom.

This year, I used rotation models often. Many of my students do not have access to consistent internet access at home. My classroom has 1:1 use of Chrome Books, so I try to use technology often. My class periods are a little less than 50 minutes long. In that time, I can deliver a whole group lesson and two 20 minute rotations or three 15 minute rotations. I can then pull students back together for the last three to five minutes of class. In stations, activities vary greatly. Students may work on follow-up activities related to my whole group lesson or on work that is individualized for their specific needs, be those needs for remedial skills or enrichment skills. Stations may be completely computer-based, jointly taught using teacher and computer, or small groups with a teacher.  They may also receive lessons that pre-teach or front load skills I expect them to learn on their own that I will follow up with later. During rotations, I can also pull students one on one for conferencing or specific individual needs.

Students are able to get some of their instruction directly from me and some from online resources. Using this strategy, I am able to differentiate for all of my learners by providing the opportunity for personalized instruction based on their particular needs, reteach/enrich as needed, teach new content, etc. by incorporating technology as part of my instruction. Blended learning allows me the opportunity to get more bang for my buck by having students complete multiple tasks in a given block. They are always working. They are consistently learning. Blended learning affords me the ability to utilize my limited time with them effectively.

Tools for Delivering Blended Instruction

The best part about using a blended model is the ability to incorporate many tools to engage and inspire learners. The variety of ways students learn and express their understanding in my class helps facilitate engagement. Below I list SOME of the tools that I use in my class. While some are used more often than others, they are all in use regularly in my classroom. (Note: All students regularly use their Google Drive to organize their files and turn in work.)

Hubs/Learning Platforms

  • Google Classroom-learning platform where you can distribute materials digitally and accept completed assignments, have online discussion streams, grade, and give feedback.
  • Blendspace-create lessons/units where all of the resources are grouped for easy access.

Video/Interactive Lesson Delivery

  • Playposit-embed questions into videos to make them less passive, and allow for accountability for the information within the video.
  • Peardeck-online presentation creator that allows you to make interactive presentations with embedded questions, links, and video.

Online Resources

  • MobyMax-online curriculum for grades K-8. Self leveling , tracks data,delivers both instruction and assessment.
  • Canva-graphic creator (make infographics, diagrams, posters, etc.)
  • Screencasts (I used Screencastify)-create video recordings with voice overs
  • Youtube-free video sharing website
  • Vocabulary.com-create a word list, enter text from a book, or use the self leveling activities to practice and expand vocabulary
  • Powtoon– online animated video creator
  • Tagul-word cloud creator

Formative Assessment

  • Nearly all of the above PLUS…
    • Plickers-student response system (ie. clickers)that does not require student devices
    • Kahoot-game show-like assessment tool where creators create the questions and users play the game.
    • Quizziz–game show-like assessment tool where creators create the questions and users play the game.
    • Quizlet-create flashcards and online game based on content

Introducing Students to Computer and Internet Safety

As educators, we are often at the forefront of teaching internet and computer safety to the students in our care. Where do you begin? As part of coursework toward my Technology Facilitation degree, I was part of a group of educators who created a song called “It’s All About Safety” using the music from Meghan Trainor’s ” All About That Base.”

It was so much fun to create! We wrote lyrics that cover everything from posting to social media to using correct posture at your computer. Take a look and leave some feedback! Without further delay…I give you Casey K, Jennifer W. and A. Dahl, It’s All About Safety.

 

It’s Not Too Late to Teach Your Students to Code

9259-power-button-on-the-side-of-a-computer-pvThe Hour of Code window may have come and gone, but it isn’t too late to teach your students to code! Coding is computer programming. Students who learn to code learn to write code in computer languages.  This can allow students to do simple tasks like control the movement of a character on a screen, or more complex tasks like creating games and stories. Before I share how to get your students started, let’s discuss WHY you should get your students started.

According to ISTE (The International Society for Technology in Education www.iste.org) “Our nation’s current trajectory points to a lasting digital era, and we’ll need people who can think like software engineers and network architects, whether they are writing an app or solving resource distribution problems in a third-world setting — or doing both at the same time.” -Pat Yongpradit, Should we teach computer science in elementary school?

11073-the-white-house-in-washington-dc-pvPresident Obama’s Computer Science for All Initiative was announced in January 2016 and promotes the teaching of computer science in grades K-12 as a means of readying American students to be, not just consumers of digital technology, but also creators. As educators, we have an opportunity to help our learners problem solve using creativity and innovation. When coding, perseverance is a must and overcoming failure and mistakes are part of the game. This is what our students need. Give your students opportunities to learn to rescue themselves and use mistakes not as obstacles, but opportunities for growth.

So how can you start coding with your students? There are several websites and programs online. I have compiled a list of free resources available online. This is by no means an exhaustive list. Instead, it is a place to start…

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Free to Code Sites

Code.org offers a series of courses that are engaging for students including themed courses using settings and characters from Star Wars, Minecraft, and Frozen. The website even offers guided programs and lesson plans for ways to use code in classrooms without consistent computer access.

Codecademy allows users to learn a variety of computer programming languages in a game-like atmosphere. As a teacher, you can download free computer science lesson plans to get you started!

Code Monster users are able to explore code writing by writing code in one box while the “cute” monster follows the code commands in the adjacent box. Budding programmers are able to explore cause and effect of the codes they write through guiding prompts.

Hackety Hack!  is a place to learn the basics of programming using the Ruby programming language.

ScratchED allows users to program interactive stories, games, simulations, and animations. It has an extensive online community to help answer questions and give advice. Resources are also available at scratched.gse.harvard.edu.

Google CS First is a complete computer science curriculum designed for kids in grade 4-8. The program uses the block-based code, SCRATCH, to engage learners in the coding world. The best part is that it is FREE. Designed to be used as a club, it has the potential to also fit into STEM curricula as well.

Turtle Academy teaches students how to write code in the LOGO computer language. Students are able to create designs and pictures using the programming methods learned during their coursework.

 

Reaching Multilingual Learners with BrainPop and YouTube

As a teacher in a school with a high population of diverse learners, I am always looking for ways to support student understanding of concepts. I know I am not the only educator who strives to get my students to “get it.” I am lucky enough to have had students who received special education services, students who received ELL services, students with highly able plans, students considered below grade level and students who were well above grade level. In the inclusive classroom, you have to find a way to reach everyone.

Before I begin, let me say I do not work for BrainPop or YouTube.

In the past, I have used BrainPop like many teachers have. My school provides subscriptions to our students. I head to BrainPop.com and have my students explore or watch a specified video and complete the quizzes or other activities. In that capacity, it is a great resource. However, using BrainPop in that way just scratches the surface of its capabilities.

I work in a school with a high population of students who receive ELL services, most speaking Spanish. Contrary to what many believe, most of our teachers do not speak Spanish, including me! I teach STEM, science and social studies. All subjects are rich in content vocabulary. One thing I like to do is find coordinating videos through Brainpop and Brainpop Español.

In an upcoming economics lesson, I will be teaching about supply and demand. I will introduce the concept through BrainPop videos. Through a quick Google translation, I was able to figure out how to say “supply and demand” in Spanish. I then found the cooresponding videos on Brainpop (Supply and Demand) and Brainpop Español (Oferta y Demanda). (Note: You will need to log in to your BrainPop account to watch these movies).

First, the entire class will watch the video in English. Then, the class will choose to watch it again in the language of their choice (English or Spanish) rewatching, pausing, and rewinding as needed and taking notes to understand the vocabulary words (like:  supply, demand, consumer, etc.). In the past, I have noticed that my native Spanish speakers will write the English and Spanish translations next to each other. Sometimes they will also annotate my notes or worksheets with the Spanish translations of vocabulary.

Videos that took me a few extra minutes to find, allow me to scaffold my instruction in a way that helps to reach my learners in a meaningful way.

BrainPop is a pay services and I know that every school doesn’t provide for it’s use. YouTube on the other hand is free. Another method that I use to support student understanding is to change the language on my closed captioning on YouTube videos.

I try to always choose videos on YouTube that have closed captioning. This allows me to play the closed captioning on the screen as students view the video. This is helpful for student comprehension (especially for students who need to see the words to understand or need help spelling new vocabulary words). I then give students the option of watching the video again with English or alternate subtitles (like Spanish or French if those languages are represented in your class). This may mean having alternate “watching stations” in the classroom. I have created a 2 minute video that explains how to change the closed captioning on YouTube videos. It is super easy to do and offers an easy way to support learners who are literate in another language.

The video Fabulous Food Chains: Crash Course Kids #7.1 was not created by A. Dahl. It was created by Crash Course Kids. 

Are You Keeping Up? The Evolution of Technology in Education

As an educator embarking on this journey to become a technology facilitator, I wondered about how technology use has changed and evolved over time. I feel that every teacher has the opportunity to infuse the use of technology (read: facilitate) into their curriculum in many ways. Are you the teacher still grasping on to old technologies when newer, more efficient ways of engaging students is at your fingertips? Take a look at “Then vs Now: How Technology in Schools Has Changed Over Time.”

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Find more education infographics on e-Learning Infographics

Is your level of technology proficiency tied to the way teachers incorporated technology in the 1930’s (via movies and television shows)? Even if you use a big, fancy interactive whiteboard, are you using it to its full potential, or are you using it to replace a film projector, overhead projector, or TV screen? Is your interactive whiteboard  just a high tech replacement for the standard whiteboard introduced in the 1960’s or worse…the chalkboard, invented in 1801?

According to Masterofartsinteaching.net, computers for student use became prolific in classrooms in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s. SMART boards came about in 1999. Kids were using games for learning on classroom computers in 1985. As educators, we shouldn’t be using technology the same way they did 15-30 YEARS AGO. You. Must. GROW!

So how is technology being used?

Learning-on-the-Go
(Find more at  How Are Students Really Using Mobile Devices on Daily Genius by Katie Dunn)

Through the use of technology we have the opportunity to engage learners in new ways. We can use the technology available in its most basic  ways OR we can make it work for us and our learners. How are you using your interactive whiteboard? Do you need ideas? Here are ways to use technology available in classrooms across the country for more than their most basic capabilities.

Here are a few places to get great ideas for taking technology use, in your classroom, to new heights: