Bingo Game Generators: A Tiny Tech Tidbit with Dahl

Have you ever just needed a BINGO game to use with students? Not one of those generic ones, but one that had content specific words or pictures.  You needed a game that was perfectly suited for the skills or subject you were teaching or differentiated to meet the needs of the students in your care. A colleague posed that question and snapped me into action. When you search “bingo generators” tons come up. This list is just a few that I think are some of the quickest and easiest to use.

bingo-score-card
Bingo Score Card Image from http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-image-bingo-score-card-image17846751
  • http://www.eslactivities.com/picturebingo.php Lets you make PICTURE bingo cards. I recommend you save the pictures you would like to use to a file before you start for quick and easy results. Make sure you print in landscape mode for best results.
  • https://bingobaker.com/ Anonymous users can only upoad 30 images in a 24 hour period (per IP address). I think you can print 8 cards free each day. For $14.95 (https://bingobaker.com/account/login/ one time lifetime membership fee) you can make tons of cards for printing or for students to play online.
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Flubaroo: A Method to Use Google Forms for Assessment

Over the last few years, I have seen a more widespread use of Google Forms occur. It seems to be the go to method for professional development evaluations. I have also incorporated its use in my classroom for exit tickets on occasion. I have just under 60 students and have found the task of individually scoring students using Google Forms to be a daunting one when percentage scores are needed. In the past, I manually tallied student responses or used the summary of responses feature to get an overall picture of classroom understanding. To individually score 50+ assessments was time-consuming, especially if more than five assessment questions were used.

The grid below shows typical data for a four question assessment taken by 10 students.

spreadsheet of 10 student responses generated by Google Forms
Spreadsheet of ten student responses generated by Google Forms
If I were to use Google Forms to assess more students, with more questions, the task of analyzing the data could become much more tedious and overwhelming. Due to that limitation, I did not use Google Forms for assessment very often this year.

Tonight in class, I learned of a much easier method of gathering data using Google Forms and the prospect of implementing it is promising.  I was so impressed by the Google add-on, Flubaroo, that I feel it warrants sharing with all of you. Flubaroo allows you to score assessments and mine data from the responses with ease.  It allows the program to “grade” for you! Please watch the short video below (created by Lisa Stamper) for a tutorial on how you can use Flubaroo for your own data needs.

When I applied the Flubaroo add-on to the data from the spreadsheet above I was pleasantly surprised by the ease of use.

After downloading the add-on as illustrated in the video, I clicked on “Flubaroo” in the pull down menu and chose my grading options.

Selecting the point values in the Flubaroo window
Selecting my grading option
Then, I chose the answer key I created by completing the Google Form myself and putting in all the correct answers (I called it “Teacher Answer Key.”

Choosing my answer key from the menu of responses
Choosing my answer key
Finally, I clicked on the “grades” tab at the bottom of the sheet and received my students’ scores!

Spreadsheet with percentile scores generated using the Flubaroo add-on for Google Forms
Scores generated by the Flubaroo add-on for Google Forms
Goodbye tedious individual grading, hello efficiency! Within 5 minutes of finishing the assessment, I can have student scores at my fingertips. Anything that makes our jobs easier is worth taking a look at. While this method will not work for student essay responses, there is an option not to score those portions of assessments using Flubaroo (so that they can be individually evaluated). Still, the benefits of using Flubaroo, in my opinion, outweigh the drawbacks. Try it for yourself, and share your opinions. If you come up with an innovative way to use Flubaroo, be sure to share that too!

Are Teachers Instructional Designers?

What is instructional design?

According to InstructionalDesign.org, instructional design is “the process by which instruction is improved through the analysis of learning needs and systematic development of learning materials. Instructional designers often use technology and multimedia as tools to enhance instruction.”

Merriam-Webster gives a simple definition for teacher: “a person or thing that teaches something; especially : a person whose job is to teach students about certain subjects.”

I think it is safe to say that educators that incorporate technology and multimedia into the planning of instruction, the deliverance of instruction, and the assessment of instruction are instructional designers. Teachers today, who incorporate 21st century skills into the very design of their teaching, are by definition instructional designers.

Do not misunderstand me, just because you add a video to instruction, does not represent an adherence to the principles of true instructional design. The incorporation of technology should improve instruction. It should allow for analysis of the learning and the impact of that instruction. So as we ask ourselves if we are instructional designers, we must also ask:

  • Is the technology we incorporate meaningful?
  • Is the technology we include an enhancement to the instruction?
  • Do we use the technology chosen because we want to or because it is the most effective way to instruct our students?

As an educator, I must constantly evaluate the effectiveness of my instruction. Finding the delicate balance between creating engaging lessons, lessons that are enhanced by technology, yet not overwhelmed by it, is the name of the game!. As I embark on that journey, I have to look more to the processes that make up instructional technology in order to truly do it justice. In the text we are using, Instructional Design for eLearning by Marina Arshavskiy, so many processes and models are being introduced. Right now, I think ADDIE will be at the forefront of our discussions.  I am looking forward to the learning…

Just something to ponder. Instructional Designer Pedagogy Word Cloud from digitalpedagog.org